Classes – Lectures – Warning – HAZING – Court Martials: How do we stop the cycle of hazing?

Phil Smith
Col USMC (ret)

Phil Smith is a retired Marine Colonel.  He enlisted in the Marine Corps and became an infantryman and then a reconnaissance Marine.  We’ll talk to him about stopping the cycle of hazing that the Marine Corps goes through repeatedly:  Class, Lecture, Warning, HAZING EVENT, investigation, court-martial.

Getting combat advising right in the long-term: Gil Barndollar & Sam Long

Gil Barndollar
Capt, USMC
Sam Long
Capt, USMC

Gil Barndollar & Sam Long were advisors in Afghanistan.  They wrote a Marine Corps Gazette article entitled “Putting the First Team on the Field: Irregular warfare and Marine Combat Advisors” — we’ll talk about the article with both authors.

With three combat deployment to Vietnam, Tom Draude watches with interest

Capt Tom Draude, USMC
Republic of Vietnam, 1970
Advisor to Vietnamese Marines
With 1stLt Tri (who had graduated from the The Basic School, Quantico VA)

Tom Draude, BGen USMC (ret) has watched each episode of the Ken Burns series “The Vietnam War” that is airing on PBS he joined us to share his thoughts on the series.  Like many, he has watched with interest the interviews with North Vietnamese Army soldiers and Viet Cong fighters; he’s also been keenly interested in how the experience of those who lost family members has been conveyed to the audience.

Draude also talks candidly about post-Vietnam Marine Corps life and how many officers put the experience away and didn’t speak of it, even with subordinates, which in retrospect was a mistakes.

 

THE VIETNAM EXPERIENCE, OUR DEFINITION OF “COMBAT” AND GENDER INTEGRATION IN OCCUPATIONAL SPECIALTIES THAT INVOLVE “INTENSE COMBAT”

Will Costantini
Col USMC (ret)

As I was waxing eloquent about how humbling it was to watch what Marines did at Con Thien in the PBS series entitled “The Vietnam War” a friend of mine, a smart one at that, called the program to talk about how we define “combat” and whether our “modern definition” contradicts 400 years of combat history but allows our civilian leaders to gender integrate military occupational specialties that involve “intense combat” and should NOT be integrated.

IRAQ UPDATE, MUQTADA AL-SADR VISITS SAUDI ARABIA & THE MOST POWERFUL MILITARY UNITS IN IRAQ: Jerry Durrant

Jerry Durrant
Col, USMC (ret)

Jerry Durrant, Col USMC (ret) joined us to talk about his time as a LCpl in Vietnam in 1970 as well as his thoughts on Iraq today.

He is currently part of a private company that does military education for the Iraqi military.  He has interesting things to say about where Iraq is and what is next for the war-torn nation.

He raises concerns about Sunni’s being eliminated from the Iraqi military, the upcoming Kurdish referendum and genuine surprise at the visit Muqtada al Sadr made to Saudi Arabia recently.

Durrant is a great representative of the Marine Corps and a thoughtful guest.

KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN — GENDER — AVIATION UPDATE : General Robert Neller, Commandant of the Marine Corps (Part 2 of 2)

General Robert B. Neller
Commandant
United States Marine Corps

The Commandant of the Marine Corps joined ALL MARINE RADIO to talk leadership and current events.

ABOUT KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN:  The Commandant isn’t sure if Marines are “buying it” when it comes to “keeping your honor clean.”  Attempts to influence character are ongoing in the Marine Corps, it’s unfinished work and Marines are trying hard but the jury is still out.  “I don’t know if you can get it until you experience it.  In the aggregate we have really good people, we just have to do a better job explaining this.”

ABOUT GENDERDoes the Marine Corps still want women who don’t want to be grunts (Capt Lauren Serrano’s question)?  The Commandant is conscious that the burden of child birth and being a mother is a heavy burden, “Of course we want her in the Marine Corps.”  “At the end of the day you have to be ready to deploy, it’s a hard life.”  “I think we’re trying to find that space, but we have to find that balance between our warfighting requirement and our retention.”

ABOUT AVIATION:  We need to fly more.  Every month our flight hours go up.  It took us years to get into this situation and it’ll take us years to get out.  Why CMC decided to have Marine Corps aviation units “take a knee” after the the 31st MEU MV-22 incident.

PART 2 of a GREAT interview.