THOUGHTS ON MY LAI: Tom Draude

Tom Draude
BGen USMC (ret)

Tom Draude, BGen USMC (ret), joins us to discuss “Leading in Vietnam” where he served three tours of duty.

The Vietnam veteran has been stained in history by the characterization of drugs, racism, rape and the killing of civilians.  What is the truth?  We’ll find out what it was it was like to lead in Vietnam by an officer with three combat tours there.

THOUGHTS ON MY LAI: Bob Nilsson

Bob Nilsson
Capt USMC
Founder, 100 Entrepreneurs Project

Bob Nilsson is a Vietnam era veteran of the Marine Corps and he joined us to discuss how My Lai impacted the Nation and those who were in uniform when it happened.

We also talk the culture that surrounded of the US military in Vietnam, were drugs and rape routine parts of that culture?

Bob was fired up for this conversation.  Don’t miss it.

KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN: My Lai (Part 4)

CPT Ernerst Medina
U.S. Army

Post-Combat related mental health… we talk about it… now you’ll get to hear what that burden sounds like from a man who is now 40 but cannot recover from the events that took place in March of 1968 that changed his live forever and resulted in three suicide attempts.  

Listening to this will leave your jaw on the floor and your brain wondering why as a leader I was never taken through the details of these events.

All the reasons you need to “Keep Your Honor Clean” are embedded in these segments… as well as the reality of “what we do in life, echos in eternity” — Darius Maximux (from the movie “Gladiator) — which is a catchy phrase that teases the reality of post-combat related mental health… you’re NOT getting over it… you’ll live with it… both the good and the bad.

KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN: My Lai (Part 3)

1LT William Calley
U.S. Army

This hour you’ll hear many of the same voices you’ve heard in parts 1 and 2… but 20 years later.  You’ll hear the anguish of living with the action they took and did not take that day.  The audio is absolutely gut wrenching.

Listening to this will leave your jaw on the floor and your brain wondering why as a leader I was never taken through the details of these events.

All the reasons you need to “Keep Your Honor Clean” are embedded in these segments… as well as the reality of “what we do in life, echos in eternity” — Darius Maximux (from the movie “Gladiator) — which is a catchy phrase that teases the reality of post-combat related mental health… you’re NOT getting over it… you’ll live with it… both the good and the bad.

LEADERSHIP, TRANSITIONING & ECHO IN RAMADI: Scott Huesing

Scott Huesing
Major, USMC (ret)

Scott Huesing, Major USMC (ret) joined us to talk about his career as an infantry Marine… both as an enlisted Marine and an officer… his transition from the active duty to civilian after twenty-four years of service as a Marine, becoming a author (Echo in Ramadi), a public speaker, a veteran’s advocate and a CEO of his own consulting company.

Scott has interesting things to say about becoming a writer and pointed things to say about leadership and why it’s important for leaders to genuinely care about those they lead.

Great stuff!

LEADERSHIP: Mike Ettore

Mike Ettore
Major, USMC (ret)
Fidelis Leadership Group

Mike Ettore is the Founder of Fidelis Leadership Group, LLC and a retired Marine Corps Infantry Officer who’s career was marked by unique leadership achievements. A Drill Instructor at the age of 20,  the recipient of the prestigious Leftwitch Trophy for company grade leadership in 1992 and combat deployments to Beirut and Kuwait for Operation Desert Storm are but a few of his achievements.

Mike joined ALL MARINE RADIO to talk his career and leadership inside and outside of the military.  His comments about moral courage being the backbone of any leader and the importance of “character” in leadership development are important lessons for any military or civilian leader.  Mike also discusses how “The Dale Carnegie Course” impacted him as a leader in his 50’s and the importance of being a lifelong learner.

An impressive humble leader with sage comments for all who aspire to be better leaders, his comments about a leader’s role in applying “rules of engagement”during contingency operations are especially pointed.

GREAT HUMAN BEING… GREAT STUFF!

COMBAT CONCEPTS VIDEO (Part 4 of 4): Col Tony Zinni, USMC

Col Tony Zinni, USMC
MCB Quantico, VA
1989

(The Q&A portion of the PME)

THE SINGLE BEST professional military education experience I ever had happened in July of 1989 while teaching “Tactics” at The Basic School in Quantico, VA.  Col Tony Zinni, USMC (who had just finished being the CO of 9th Marine Regiment on Okinawa) gave his “Combat Concepts” pitch at an event that the Marine Corps University sponsored at The Basic School.

Major John Kelly (Head of the Infantry Officers Course at the time, destined to be a General Officer and currently the Secretary of the Dept of Homeland Security) told me I should attend… so I went.  I had never heard of Col Zinni at that point in my life.  That night Col Zinni was funny, insightful and had a ton of experiences in his career — he was for me a great example of what a professional warrior/scholar ought to be.

This PME changed my life and how I approached my profession.

COMBAT CONCEPTS VIDEO (Part 3 of 4): Col Tony Zinni, USMC

Col Tony Zinni, USMC
MCB Quantico, VA
1989

THE SINGLE BEST professional military education experience I ever had happened in July of 1989 while teaching “Tactics” at The Basic School in Quantico, VA.  Col Tony Zinni, USMC (who had just finished being the CO of 9th Marine Regiment on Okinawa) gave his “Combat Concepts” pitch at an event that the Marine Corps University sponsored at The Basic School.

Major John Kelly (Head of the Infantry Officers Course at the time, destined to be a General Officer and currently the Secretary of the Dept of Homeland Security) told me I should attend… so I went.  I had never heard of Col Zinni at that point in my life.  That night Col Zinni was funny, insightful and had a ton of experiences in his career — he was for me a great example of what a professional warrior/scholar ought to be.

This PME changed my life and how I approached my profession.

COMBAT CONCEPTS VIDEO (Part 2 of 4): Col Tony Zinni, USMC

Col Tony Zinni, USMC
MCB Quantico, VA
1989

THE SINGLE BEST professional military education experience I ever had happened in July of 1989 while teaching “Tactics” at The Basic School in Quantico, VA.  Col Tony Zinni, USMC (who had just finished being the CO of 9th Marine Regiment on Okinawa) gave his “Combat Concepts” pitch at an event that the Marine Corps University sponsored at The Basic School.

Major John Kelly (Head of the Infantry Officers Course at the time, destined to be a General Officer and currently the Secretary of the Dept of Homeland Security) told me I should attend… so I went.  I had never heard of Col Zinni at that point in my life.  That night Col Zinni was funny, insightful and had a ton of experiences in his career — he was for me a great example of what a professional warrior/scholar ought to be.

This PME changed my life and how I approached my profession.