Reading List

READING RECOMMENDATIONS 

AMR’s Head Chef’s Thanksgiving Cookbook Recommendation

Here is the “Cooks Illustrated All-Time Best Thanksgiving Recipes” that the ALL MARINE RADIO Head Chef spoke of today!   Search on that for a GREAT BOOK!

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A U.S. Military Academy faculty member at West Point wrote a letter about the declining state of the institution — here it is

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Washington Post:  Fatal Force 2017  — (Police shootings in the United States)

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Gun Deaths in America  (fivethirtyeight.com)

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The Real Reason the US Navy Keeps Hitting Merchant Vessels  (inmilitary.com)

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A Savage War Williamson MurrayWayne Wei-siang Hsieh;

The Civil War represented a momentous change in the character of war. It combined the projection of military might across a continent on a scale never before seen with an unprecedented mass mobilization of peoples. Yet despite the revolutionizing aspects of the Civil War, its leaders faced the same uncertainties and vagaries of chance that have vexed combatants since the days of Thucydides and the Peloponnesian War. A Savage War sheds critical new light on this defining chapter in military history.

Recommended by Will Costantini

 

 

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Autumn of the Black Snake, Willam Hogeland 

The forgotten story of how the U.S. Army was created to fight a crucial Indian war.

In 1783, with the signing of the Peace of Paris, the American Revolution was complete. And yet even as the newly independent United States secured peace with Great Britain, it found itself losing an escalating military conflict on its borderlands. The enemy was the indigenous people of the Ohio Valley, who rightly saw the new nation as a threat to their existence. In 1791, years of skirmishes, raids, and quagmires climaxed in the grisly defeat of a motley collection of irregular American militiamen by a brilliantly organized confederation of Shawnee, Miami, and Delaware Indians—with nearly one thousand U.S. casualties, the worst defeat the nation would ever suffer at native hands. Americans were shocked, perhaps none more so than their commander in chief, George Washington, who came to a fateful conclusion: the United States needed an army.   

Recommended by Will Costantini