KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN: My Lai (Part 4)

CPT Ernerst Medina
U.S. Army

Post-Combat related mental health… we talk about it… now you’ll get to hear what that burden sounds like from a man who is now 40 but cannot recover from the events that took place in March of 1968 that changed his live forever and resulted in three suicide attempts.  

Listening to this will leave your jaw on the floor and your brain wondering why as a leader I was never taken through the details of these events.

All the reasons you need to “Keep Your Honor Clean” are embedded in these segments… as well as the reality of “what we do in life, echos in eternity” — Darius Maximux (from the movie “Gladiator) — which is a catchy phrase that teases the reality of post-combat related mental health… you’re NOT getting over it… you’ll live with it… both the good and the bad.

KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN: My Lai (Part 3)

1LT William Calley
U.S. Army

This hour you’ll hear many of the same voices you’ve heard in parts 1 and 2… but 20 years later.  You’ll hear the anguish of living with the action they took and did not take that day.  The audio is absolutely gut wrenching.

Listening to this will leave your jaw on the floor and your brain wondering why as a leader I was never taken through the details of these events.

All the reasons you need to “Keep Your Honor Clean” are embedded in these segments… as well as the reality of “what we do in life, echos in eternity” — Darius Maximux (from the movie “Gladiator) — which is a catchy phrase that teases the reality of post-combat related mental health… you’re NOT getting over it… you’ll live with it… both the good and the bad.

KEEP YOUR HONOR CLEAN: My Lai (Part 2)

How could an American rifle company kill over 500 civilians — elderly, women, children and babies?  How did American soldiers rape women with other watching? How could the US Army Division, who owned that company, cover it up?  How could only one person be convicted in the case?

How do they live with it?

What made one helicopter land and intervene in the massacre?

One of the most incredibly horrific events in US Military history and another example of “leadership at the point of confrontation” — you’ll hear their voices.

In this hour, you’ll hear the voices of the Soldiers who participated in the massacre, the voice of Hugh Thompson who landed his helicopter to save Vietnamese civilians and the voices of Vietnamese survivors.

Listening to this will leave your jaw on the floor and your brain wondering why as a leader I was never taken through the details of these events.

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